Learning Community Seminar Offerings

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Learning Community Seminars explore academic topics of interest as they orient students to the College environment. First-time-to-college students pursuing associate degrees and enrolled in nine or more credits are required to take a Seminar or a Cluster within their first year. Students in Learning Community Seminars enjoy small class sizes, integrated support services, and hands-on activities such as field study and team projects.

 

Art, Culture & Media

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Batarangs and Kryptonite - 3 Credits -

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Batarangs and Kryptonite - 3 Credits -

More than simply enduring, super heroes like Batman, Wonder Woman, and Spider-Man have earned their places in literature. The longevity of the character Batman, who celebrates his 75th anniversary this year, dismisses any notion that this slice of pop culture is disposable. This seminar will examine the history of comic book heroes as well as the themes their adventures have long illustrated: heroism, identity, morality and self-improvement. Through readings, writing, classroom activities and field study, you will explore the world of comic books and reinvent yourself as a comic book hero. Open to first-year students.

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Do the Right Thing - 3 Credits -

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Do the Right Thing - 3 Credits -

In his classic movie “Do the Right Thing,” Spike Lee raised profound questions about urban race relations, social exclusion/inclusion, injustice, and the ambiguity inherent in moral choice. In this course you will identify themes from Lee’s film to explore further in other texts, American history, and your own experiences. You will examine the influences of cultural role models and heroes, and America’s history of racial violence. Through reading, writing, viewing and interactive group assignments, you will challenge one another to think critically about urban conflict, self-empowerment, and what it means to “do the right thing.” Open to first-year students.

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Got Art? - 3 Credits -

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Got Art? - 3 Credits -

What is art? Is it public? Is it personal? Is it only in museums? This Seminar is about learning to look at our created visual environment in ways that enhance art appreciation. Art is not just for artists; art is political, social, personal, and it is everywhere. You will explore, assess and develop responses to the arts through class activities, visits to the BHCC gallery, field trips, and participation in a service learning project. This Seminar will introduce a fundamental art vocabulary and provide a basic understanding of artistic media and techniques. You will work together to design virtual museums and galleries that will represent their philosophies of art. Open to first-year students.

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Haunting Lessons: Exploring Cultural Beliefs about the Supernatural - 3 credits -

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Haunting Lessons: Exploring Cultural Beliefs about the Supernatural - 3 credits -

From classics such as Dracula, Frankenstein, and A Christmas Carol to the modern sensation of Harry Potter, our society continues to be captivated by the supernatural. Through readings, writing, discussion, field study, and a group project, you will examine cultural beliefs in the supernatural and analyze these beliefs as a metaphor for many of the desires and fears in our lives - power, eternal life, and the duality of human nature and unbridled science. Open to first-year students.

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Hip Hop: The American Experience - 3 credits -

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Hip Hop: The American Experience - 3 credits -

In this course, you will explore the world of Hip Hop through listening, reading, writing and interactive group projects. You will trace the origins of Hip Hop from the Bronx in the 1970’s through to the global phenomenon this genre has become today. Topics will include: the intersection between Hip Hop and issues of race, gender, and class, urban politics, and the dual dichotomy of the American experience. Open to first-year students interested in Hip Hop music and culture.

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Hot Couture - 3 Credits -

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Hot Couture - 3 Credits -

As Coco Chanel stated, “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.” In this course, you will engage in the study of fashion as it reflects changing perspectives in society. You will survey major influences in global fashion capitals including: New York, Paris, Tokyo and Dubai among others. In addition, you will critically examine the impact of fashion on the global economy, while exploring different career paths within the fashion industry. Through presentations, classroom activities, and community projects you will reflect on how fashion affects your everyday life. Open to first-year students.

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Let Me Clear My Throat - 3 Credits -

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Let Me Clear My Throat - 3 Credits -

In this course, students will respond creatively and critically to current social, economic and political issues/topics/themes that are associated with public perceptions of urban communities. Students will be introduced to the elements of craft, voice, form, techniques and styles of the journal writing process, in order to reclaim and give voice to their own experiences. Open to first-year students.

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The Lying Game - 3 Credits -

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The Lying Game - 3 Credits -

What do we mean by Truth-telling? This course explores the nonverbal clues-facial expressions, gestures, and body language - that impact communication and how truth is interpreted. Through readings, film and television viewing, group discussions and projects, field study and social experiments, students will consider the ways in which information is conveyed differently across culture, the impact of race and gender on communication, and how an understanding of these dynamics can help them to achieve their personal, professional and academic goals. Open to first-year students.

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Life in Rhymes: Voicing Your Future - 3 credits -

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Life in Rhymes: Voicing Your Future - 3 credits -

This course will inspire you to tap into your creative skills, build strength and confidence in your writing, and go forth into higher education with a more clear connection to your life goals and vision. You will examine the art of poetry, song, and hip hop and through reflection develop a better understanding of personal identity, purpose, and potential. Through an exploration of career and life shaping strategies, you will design blogs and ePortfolios to present and share expressive ideas and build a professional online presence. Open to first-year students.

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Living Online: Media Literacy in the 21st Century - 3 Credits -

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Living Online: Media Literacy in the 21st Century - 3 Credits -

From television to film to social media and video games, mass media influences how and what people think, feel and believe. In this course, you will examine why the media influences society so strongly by breaking down the images and messages sent and received every day through the mass media. Topics include gender and advertising, masculinity and hip hop, bullying and social media, violence, ethics, values and stereotyping. In this class, you will become more media literate by creating original media. Open to first-year students.

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Telling Our Stories - 3 Credits -

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Telling Our Stories - 3 Credits -

In this class, you will learn about the significant role stories and storytelling play in society. From bedtime stories, gripping newspaper headlines, history, to stories inherited from one generation to another, stories are imbedded in the fabric of people’s lives. This class explores the art of storytelling through writing exercises, reading assignments, classroom discussions and museum visits. Throughout the course, you will examine short stories and creative nonfiction by master storytellers Baldwin, Bambara, Butler, Lamott, O’Brien, O’Connor and Walker in this seminar and craft original short stories and creative essays. Open to first-year students.

Civics & Politics

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Motivations and Movements Exploring Careers in Behavioral Science - 3 credits -

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Motivations and Movements Exploring Careers in Behavioral Science - 3 credits -

This course examines what it means to be a psychologist and sociologist. You will have the opportunity to stand on the spot where the Boston Massacre occurred, cheer on Boston sports teams, and explore what motivates individuals and groups of people to participate in these and other actions. Career options in the behavioral science field will be explored. Open to first-year students interested in the behavioral or social science fields.

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Politically Incorrect - 3 Credits -

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Politically Incorrect - 3 Credits -

What does it mean to be politically correct or politically incorrect? Society has trained us to be politically correct, but we rarely examine what exactly this means and how it affects us. This class is designed to create a safe environment where you can explore the social dynamics around race, gender, religion and sexual orientation, and the policies and movements that have influenced these social constructions. Through readings, writing assignments, collaborative projects, and filed study, you will consider and reconsider what it means to be politically correct. Open to first-year students.

Race, Ethnicity & Cultural Identity

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Beyond East and West: Asians in the U.S. - 3 Credits -

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Beyond East and West: Asians in the U.S. - 3 Credits -

Asians are one of the fastest growing populations in the United States, yet there are few opportunities to discuss the Asian American experience. In this course, you will explore the social, historical and structural contexts defining the experiences of Asian Americans, with a particular focus on local communities in Boston and Massachusetts. Topics such as immigration, labor, community development, politics, gender and family dynamics, and race relations are examined. Through reading, writing, classroom discussion and field study, the class learns about the challenges, achievements and contributions of Asians in the United States. Open to first-year students and designed for Asian and Asian American students.

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Connecting to your Inner Orange Line- Next Stop: Community College - 3 credits -

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Connecting to your Inner Orange Line- Next Stop: Community College - 3 credits -

Using Boston subway's "Orange Line" as a metaphor for life, this course explores the many critical issues faced by urban males. Drawing on the traditions of the Yoruba of Africa, the Buddhist of Asia, the Natives of America, and the Judeo-Christian foundations of American religious thought, you will engage in a variety of activities designed to create community and foster personal transformation. Open to first-year students.

This course is designed for urban males.

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Do the Right Thing - 3 Credits -

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Do the Right Thing - 3 Credits -

In his classic movie “Do the Right Thing,” Spike Lee raised profound questions about urban race relations, social exclusion/inclusion, injustice, and the ambiguity inherent in moral choice. In this course you will identify themes from Lee’s film to explore further in other texts, American history, and your own experiences. You will examine the influences of cultural role models and heroes, and America’s history of racial violence. Through reading, writing, viewing and interactive group assignments, you will challenge one another to think critically about urban conflict, self-empowerment, and what it means to “do the right thing.” Open to first-year students.

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Gender, Race, and the Media - 3 credits -

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Gender, Race, and the Media - 3 credits -

This course considers gender and racial identity in America from a number of personal and critical perspectives. Elements of modern media and popular culture are examined to help illustrate the socio-cultural contexts of each work. Through engaging in discussions, critical reflection, writing, you will collaborate with each other to better understand the role that gender and race play in the modern world. This course provides a supportive environment to discuss critical and controversial issues surrounding modern day culture and gender and race dynamics.

Open to first-year students.

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Hip Hop: The American Experience - 3 credits -

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Hip Hop: The American Experience - 3 credits -

In this course, you will explore the world of Hip Hop through listening, reading, writing and interactive group projects. You will trace the origins of Hip Hop from the Bronx in the 1970’s through to the global phenomenon this genre has become today. Topics will include: the intersection between Hip Hop and issues of race, gender, and class, urban politics, and the dual dichotomy of the American experience. Open to first-year students interested in Hip Hop music and culture.

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Latinas: A Culture of Empowerment - 3 Credits -

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Latinas: A Culture of Empowerment - 3 Credits -

What do Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, writer Isabel Allende, Boston businesswoman Ivonne Garcia, and Celebrity Chef Evette Rios have in common? They are all Successful Latina women making significant contributions in their fields and in their communities. Through readings, writing assignments, collaborative projects and case studies of these accomplished women, you will explore the social, historical and structural contexts defining the experiences of Latinas in the United States. You will learn how to utilize lessons from these stories to better understand your own identity, academic goals and career aspirations. Open to first-year students and designed for Latina students.

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Let Me Clear My Throat - 3 Credits -

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Let Me Clear My Throat - 3 Credits -

In this course, students will respond creatively and critically to current social, economic and political issues/topics/themes that are associated with public perceptions of urban communities. Students will be introduced to the elements of craft, voice, form, techniques and styles of the journal writing process, in order to reclaim and give voice to their own experiences. Open to first-year students.

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The Lying Game - 3 Credits -

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The Lying Game - 3 Credits -

What do we mean by Truth-telling? This course explores the nonverbal clues-facial expressions, gestures, and body language - that impact communication and how truth is interpreted. Through readings, film and television viewing, group discussions and projects, field study and social experiments, students will consider the ways in which information is conveyed differently across culture, the impact of race and gender on communication, and how an understanding of these dynamics can help them to achieve their personal, professional and academic goals. Open to first-year students.

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Parents As First Teachers - 3 Credits -

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Parents As First Teachers - 3 Credits -

In this seminar, you will explore methods of incorporating literacy into children's lives. Topics will include reading with children and best practices for developing a print-rich environment at home. This course is appropriate for parents and prospective parents, child-care providers, elementary education majors, early childhood majors, nursing or medical field majors, social work majors, and anyone interested in modeling good reading habits for children. Open to first-year students.

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Red, White, Blue and Islam - 3 credits -

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Red, White, Blue and Islam - 3 credits -

Given that Islam is the largest religion in the world and one in every five individuals identifies themselves as Muslim today, our understanding of Islam is crucial. In this Seminar, you will examine various aspects of Islam: Islamic religious beliefs, diversity in Islamic culture, the status of women in Islam, and the concept of Jihad. A brief historical overview of the relationship between Islam and the west will provide the context for study. Class activities will include visiting a local Mosque and experiencing Muslim culture though tasting traditional foods, exploring clothing, listening to music, and examining art . Open to first-year students.

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Sports Psychology: Success in Sports & Life - 3 Credits -

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Sports Psychology: Success in Sports & Life - 3 Credits -

Success in college and success in sports are the result of similar efforts. This seminar examines the factors behind successful athletes and how those factors translate to successful academics. The seminar discusses how student and professional athletes manage the demands of athletics and academics and/or outside commitments. You will examine a wide range of sports-related topics, including health and fitness, college eligibility, community engagement and education through sports; and how sports can reflect the aspirations and attitudes of a community. Open to first-year students.

This course is designed for student athletes.

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Telling Our Stories - 3 Credits -

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Telling Our Stories - 3 Credits -

In this class, you will learn about the significant role stories and storytelling play in society. From bedtime stories, gripping newspaper headlines, history, to stories inherited from one generation to another, stories are imbedded in the fabric of people’s lives. This class explores the art of storytelling through writing exercises, reading assignments, classroom discussions and museum visits. Throughout the course, you will examine short stories and creative nonfiction by master storytellers Baldwin, Bambara, Butler, Lamott, O’Brien, O’Connor and Walker in this seminar and craft original short stories and creative essays. Open to first-year students.

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Voices from the Margins: Readings in Contemporary Gay & Lesbian Literature in America - 3 credits -

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Voices from the Margins: Readings in Contemporary Gay & Lesbian Literature in America - 3 credits -

The course will introduce you to a variety of gay and lesbian authors who write from marginalized positions. Their voices represent how diverse this country truly is in respect to race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The course will concentrate on works written since 1980 to explore how each of these distinct voices comes to define itself in the face of social ostracism, denial, and even violence. You will keep reading journals and write essays that explore relationships between their own experiences and those of the writers we examine. Open to first-year students.

Gender & Identity

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Ain't I a Woman Unpacked and Re-packed - 3 credits -

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Ain't I a Woman Unpacked and Re-packed - 3 credits -

What does it mean to be a good, strong, loving and successful woman? Women's rights activists Sojourner Truth and bell hooks have each articulated, for their time, a vision of what it means. In this course, you will develop your own vision of what it means in today's world. The course will include an examination of the history and psychosocial forces that shape identity, including biology, family, relationships and social networks. You will read, write, reflect, discuss, create, collaborate and act. Open to first-year students. This course is designed for women.

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Connecting To Your Inner Orange Line – Next Stop: Community College - 3 Credits -

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Connecting To Your Inner Orange Line – Next Stop: Community College - 3 Credits -

Using Boston subway's "Orange Line" as a metaphor for life, this course explores the many critical issues faced by urban males. Drawing on the traditions of the Yoruba of Africa, the Buddhist of Asia, the Natives of America, and the Judeo-Christian foundations of American religious thought, you will engage in a variety of activities designed to create community and foster personal transformation. Open to first-year students. This course is designed for urban males.

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Gender, Race, and the Media - 3 credits -

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Gender, Race, and the Media - 3 credits -

This course considers gender and racial identity in America from a number of personal and critical perspectives. Elements of modern media and popular culture are examined to help illustrate the socio-cultural contexts of each work. Through engaging in discussions, critical reflection, writing, you will collaborate with each other to better understand the role that gender and race play in the modern world. This course provides a supportive environment to discuss critical and controversial issues surrounding modern day culture and gender and race dynamics. Open to first-year students.

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Latinas: A Culture of Empowerment - 3 Credits -

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Latinas: A Culture of Empowerment - 3 Credits -

What do Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, writer Isabel Allende, Boston businesswoman Ivonne Garcia, and Celebrity Chef Evette Rios have in common? They are all Successful Latina women making significant contributions in their fields and in their communities. Through readings, writing assignments, collaborative projects and case studies of these accomplished women, you will explore the social, historical and structural contexts defining the experiences of Latinas in the United States. You will learn how to utilize lessons from these stories to better understand your own identity, academic goals and career aspirations. Open to first-year students and designed for Latina students.

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The Lying Game - 3 Credits -

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The Lying Game - 3 Credits -

What do we mean by Truth-telling? This course explores the nonverbal clues-facial expressions, gestures, and body language - that impact communication and how truth is interpreted. Through readings, film and television viewing, group discussions and projects, field study and social experiments, students will consider the ways in which information is conveyed differently across culture, the impact of race and gender on communication, and how an understanding of these dynamics can help them to achieve their personal, professional and academic goals. Open to first-year students.

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Telling Our Stories - 3 Credits -

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Telling Our Stories - 3 Credits -

In this class, you will learn about the significant role stories and storytelling play in society. From bedtime stories, gripping newspaper headlines, history, to stories inherited from one generation to another, stories are imbedded in the fabric of people’s lives. This class explores the art of storytelling through writing exercises, reading assignments, classroom discussions and museum visits. Throughout the course, you will examine short stories and creative nonfiction by master storytellers Baldwin, Bambara, Butler, Lamott, O’Brien, O’Connor and Walker in this seminar and craft original short stories and creative essays. Open to first-year students.

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Voices from the Margins: Readings in Contemporary Gay & Lesbian Literature in America - 3 credits -

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Voices from the Margins: Readings in Contemporary Gay & Lesbian Literature in America - 3 credits -

The course will introduce you to a variety of gay and lesbian authors who write from marginalized positions. Their voices represent how diverse this country truly is in respect to race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The course will concentrate on works written since 1980 to explore how each of these distinct voices comes to define itself in the face of social ostracism, denial, and even violence. You will keep reading journals and write essays that explore relationships between their own experiences and those of the writers we examine. Open to first-year students.

Health & Wellness

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Careers in Health Care - 3 credits -

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Careers in Health Care - 3 credits -

This course offers answers to the following questions. What do the various health professions do? What are the qualifications for the various health professions? What credentials are needed? The seminar will explore health professions such as nursing, medical imaging, occupational therapy, physical therapy, respiratory therapy, and surgical technology. Current issues facing health care will be discussed, including patient interactions, end of life issues, health disparities and workforce shortages. Open to first year students interested in pursuing a career in health.

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Getting Fit Together - 3 Credits -

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Getting Fit Together - 3 Credits -

What are the challenges and rewards to living a healthy lifestyle? In this course, you will stay abreast of health issues and set personal health and wellness goals. A broad range of issues will be explored including nutrition, physical fitness, stress management and social and emotional wellness. You will learn about the importance of knowledge, attitude and awareness related to health and wellness. Each week one hour of class will be spent in the College’s Fitness Center. Open to first-year students.

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Healthy Habits: Healthy Neighborhoods - 3 credits -

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Healthy Habits: Healthy Neighborhoods - 3 credits -

The social, physical and economic environments, in which we live and work can actually get under our skin, just as the germs and viruses that make us sick. This course highlights the major health challenges of Boston residents, and discusses the intersection of wellness, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender and age. Through readings, discussions, films, and writing, you will examine issues of urban health and develop strategies for their own personal wellness. Open to first-year students.

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Open Spaces - 3 credits -

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Open Spaces - 3 credits -

Through reading, writing, fieldwork and research, this class will examine the relationship between humans and open spaces. By visiting and studying nearby parks, beaches, and forests, students will build an understanding of the factors that influence, both positively and negatively, individuals and society. You will consider how open spaces impact stress, fitness, personal relationships, and the environment. Coursework will include readings, movies, classroom activities, field study, journal writing, oral presentations, research, and participation in a service learning project. Open to first-year students.

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Stepping Out of the Box - 3 Credits -

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Stepping Out of the Box - 3 Credits -

Have you ever accomplished something that you were told was out of reach? This class will focus on icons, athletes, and everyday people who have pushed self-imposed and societal boundaries to achieve great success. Students will explore the ways in which they have been boxed into certain social, cultural, familial, and academic roles and expectations, and they will develop and explore strategies to push down walls, step out of boxes, challenge boundaries and maximize their potential to achieve their goals. Open to first-year students.

Learning & Success

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Guide to Purpose & Success - 3 Credits -

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Guide to Purpose & Success - 3 Credits -

College is not just about learning a specific program of study but also about discovering what you want to do in life or who you want to become. Your experiences inside and outside of the classroom can change or confirm your purpose, place and direction in life. Through readings, class discussions, multi-media sources, and writing, you will examine your educational plans, career plans, personal goals, and begin to define your purpose, place and direction in college and in life. Open to first-year students.

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Learning for Success - 3 Credits -

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Learning for Success - 3 Credits -

This course provides an understanding of the learning process, the role learning styles play, how memory works, and the impact of attention on learning. You will discover their learning styles and practice strategies for maximizing learning potential, improving attention, and helping memory work more efficiently. Open to first-year students.

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The Balancing Act: Juggling Work, School & Life - 3 credits -

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The Balancing Act: Juggling Work, School & Life - 3 credits -

This course provides a supportive environment for students facing the challenges of juggling work, school and life responsibilities. You will practice the skills needed to overcome barriers to learning and achieve personal, college, and career goals. Open to first-year students who face significant responsibilities outside of school.

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Life in Rhymes: Voicing Your Future - 3 credits -

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Life in Rhymes: Voicing Your Future - 3 credits -

This course will inspire you to tap into your creative skills, build strength and confidence in your writing, and go forth into higher education with a more clear connection to your life goals and vision. You will examine the art of poetry, song, and hip hop and through reflection develop a better understanding of personal identity, purpose, and potential. Through an exploration of career and life shaping strategies, you will design blogs and ePortfolios to present and share expressive ideas and build a professional online presence. Open to first-year students.    

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To the Top - 3 credits -

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To the Top - 3 credits -

Through the exploration of mountaineering literature and film, this class will examine the themes of taking risks and overcoming adversity. By looking at accounts of various mountaineers in books, articles, and movies, you will study the reasons for the expeditions’ successes and failures. You will consider how risk taking and overcoming adversity connect with their academic success, career goals and personal experience. Coursework will include reading assignments, movies, classroom activities, online journals, oral presentations, a research project, and participation in a service learning project. Open to first-year students.

Military & Veterans

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Military: Before, During, & After - 3 Credits -

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Military: Before, During, & After - 3 Credits -

The course will offer strategies to help the military student succeed in college, work, family and other social settings, with emphasis on academic and interpersonal skills and techniques for managing readjustment and transition. If you are a veteran, you will have the chance to work and study with others who have had similar life experiences. Through readings, writing, and discussion, you will explore how military experiences change us. Texts include Homer's “The Odyssey,” Jonathan Shay’s “Odysseus in America,” and Tim O'Brien's “The Things They Carried.” Open to first-year students.

This course is designed to support military members in making a positive transition from military to civilian life.

Religion & Spirituality

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Red, White, Blue and Islam - 3 credits -

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Red, White, Blue and Islam - 3 credits -

Given that Islam is the largest religion in the world and one in every five individuals identifies themselves as Muslim today, our understanding of Islam is crucial. In this Seminar, you will examine various aspects of Islam: Islamic religious beliefs, diversity in Islamic culture, the status of women in Islam, and the concept of Jihad. A brief historical overview of the relationship between Islam and the west will provide the context for study. Class activities will include visiting a local Mosque and experiencing Muslim culture though tasting traditional foods, exploring clothing, listening to music, and examining art . Open to first-year students.

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Science and Religion - 3 Credits -

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Science and Religion - 3 Credits -

How do science and religion influence each other in the pursuit of knowledge and truth? In this course, students will explore the relationship between religion and science, how their relationship has shaped civilization, and the various questions that arise at the interaction of these seemingly contradictory disciplines. Through team projects, discussions, readings and oral presentations, students will consider evolution and historical events from multiple religious and scientific perspectives. Open to first-year students.

Science & Sustainability

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Energy, Life, & Sustainability - 3 credits -

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Energy, Life, & Sustainability - 3 credits -

Investigate the environmental and social consequences of energy production and consumption with emphasis on climate change impacts. This seminar will explore solutions to slow down global warming and investigate new sources of clean and sustainable energy. Learn how we can all play a role in ensuring a more livable planet. Open to first-year students.

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Life & Light: The Intersection of Optical Technology & Biology - 3 credits -

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Life & Light: The Intersection of Optical Technology & Biology - 3 credits -

In this course, you will explore concepts and principles of the study of life, Biology, and the applications of light, Photonics. You will learn about this emerging scientific area that is used to study and understand the inner workings of cells and tissues in living organisms. In this class, you will examine the fundamental principles of Biology and Photonics through a combination of laboratory and classroom exercises, and apply these ideas to real-world devices that are used to answer or ask questions that address pharmaceutical, biomedical and biological issues. Open to first-year students interested in the sciences.

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Science and Religion - 3 Credits -

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Science and Religion - 3 Credits -

How do science and religion influence each other in the pursuit of knowledge and truth? In this course, students will explore the relationship between religion and science, how their relationship has shaped civilization, and the various questions that arise at the interaction of these seemingly contradictory disciplines. Through team projects, discussions, readings and oral presentations, students will consider evolution and historical events from multiple religious and scientific perspectives. Open to first-year students.

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Stepping Out of the Box - 3 Credits -

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Stepping Out of the Box - 3 Credits -

Have you ever accomplished something that you were told was out of reach? This class will focus on icons, athletes, and everyday people who have pushed self-imposed and societal boundaries to achieve great success. Students will explore the ways in which they have been boxed into certain social, cultural, familial, and academic roles and expectations, and they will develop and explore strategies to push down walls, step out of boxes, challenge boundaries and maximize their potential to achieve their goals. Open to first-year students.

Work & Family

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Financial Literacy for All - 3 Credits -

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Financial Literacy for All - 3 Credits -

This course will provide you with the skills and knowledge to make informed and effective financial decisions. You will explore the basics of financial literacy, from balancing a checkbook to investing in a 401k. You will engage in activities that will help you set financial goals while learning to manage debt, understand their credit score, evaluate alternative modes of financing and plan for retirement. Open to first-year students.

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Parents As First Teachers - 3 Credits -

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Parents As First Teachers - 3 Credits -

In this seminar, you will explore methods of incorporating literacy into children's lives. Topics will include reading with children and best practices for developing a print-rich environment at home. This course is appropriate for parents and prospective parents, child-care providers, elementary education majors, early childhood majors, nursing or medical field majors, social work majors, and anyone interested in modeling good reading habits for children. Open to first-year students.

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The Balancing Act: Juggling Work, School & Life - 3 credits -

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The Balancing Act: Juggling Work, School & Life - 3 credits -

This course provides a supportive environment for students facing the challenges of juggling work, school and life responsibilities. You will practice the skills needed to overcome barriers to learning and achieve personal, college, and career goals. Open to first-year students who face significant responsibilities outside of school.

Professional Studies Seminars

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Becoming a Teacher - 3 credits -

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Becoming a Teacher - 3 credits -

This learning community seminar is designed for education majors who are interested in making a difference in today's public schools. Inspired by the movie Waiting for Superman, this seminar looks at some of the pressing issues in today's public schools: overcrowding, lack of funding, outdated curriculum, classroom chaos, and shortage of good teachers (among many others). Sign up for this seminar and join students who want to join the next generation of super teachers.

Requirement: Must be an Education Major to enroll and should be in first two semesters of study at BHCC with 16 college credits or less completed.

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Game Development Essentials - 3 Credits -

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Game Development Essentials - 3 Credits -

This course will present the principles, concepts, and components all of games and the gaming industry’s processes, methodologies, and principles associated with the design, development, and distribution of computer-based games and computer-based simulations. This course is designed to provide you with an overall comprehension of all the precepts and building blocks that are essential to every computer-based game and simulation. This course fulfills the Learning Community Seminar requirement for students in Computer Media Technology.

Prerequisites: Writing Skills II (ENG095) and Reading Skills II (RDG095) or placement.

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Globalization - 3 Credits -

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Globalization - 3 Credits -

This course is an exploration of the nature, reasons for and consequences of globalization. Topics include global economic integration, cultural convergence, global institutions, multinational corporations and global business. You will acquire an understanding of globalization’s role in history, geography, politics, culture, and technology, as well as its impact on labor, standards of living and the environment. This course enables you to explore career options in international business, define a career path, and make connections between classroom learning and the larger business community.

This course fulfills the Learning Community Seminar requirement for first year college students to assist the student in making a successful transition into the college environment. You will develop insights, skills, and attitudes necessary to develop academic success strategies for personal and career goals achievement.

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Academic Reading III (ESL098) and Academic Writing III (ESL099) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) and Writing Skills I (ENG090) or placement equivalents.

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If You Can't Stand the Heat - 3 Credits -

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If You Can't Stand the Heat - 3 Credits -

This course introduces you to the challenges and responsibilities encountered by culinary arts students. It provides you with an in depth knowledge of the options available within the culinary arts industry. The course prepares you with skills necessary to prepare a resume, gain interview skills and become familiar with all of the resources that the college has to offer.

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Vital Signs: Understanding Human Behavior for the Health Professional - 3 credits -

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Vital Signs: Understanding Human Behavior for the Health Professional - 3 credits -

This course introduces students to the challenges and responsibilities of healthcare professionals and college students. Discussions center on cross-cultural issues, human growth and development; psychological and sociological factors involved in the patient healthcare professional relationship.

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Hospitality Seminar - 3 Credits -

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Hospitality Seminar - 3 Credits -

This course provides you with an in depth, experiential understanding of the options available within the hospitality industry. Topics covered include industry specific areas such as Hotels, Resorts, Cruises, Tours, Convention and Visitors Bureaus and Travel Agencies with particular focus on the skills and abilities that each individual needs to create a successful career. Guest speakers and site visits are an integral part of this course.

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Information Technology Problem Solving - 3 Credits -

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Information Technology Problem Solving - 3 Credits -

This course will give students hands-on experience in a wide range of modern information technology. Several IT concepts will be introduced that will provide a basis for further study in Information Technology. You will work on a number of projects that will give perspectives on areas of IT including but not limited to: visual and/or robotic programming, social networking tools, web design and networking. Issues of security, privacy and ethics will also be examined. You will leave the course with an understanding of the components of modern IT systems and the scope of knowledge needed to become an IT professional. You are expected to have access to computer with internet access outside of class as there is a major web component to the course.

Designed for first-time, full-time Computer Technology students, this course will fulfill the Learning Community Seminar requirement for the Computer Information Technology Department. First year students registering for this course should not register for Applications/Concepts (CIT110). This course is not for Computer Science Transfer, Gaming or Web majors.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Reading Skills I (RDG090) and Writing Skills I (ENG090) or placement.

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Introduction to Business - 3 Credits -

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Introduction to Business - 3 Credits -

This course is a survey of the purpose, role, and responsibility of business in a capitalistic society, including an introduction to the major areas of business such as: Finance, Management, Economics, Accounting, and Marketing. This course provides a basic foundation for the student who will specialize in some aspect of business in college, and it also provides the opportunity for non-business majors to learn about the business in which they will someday be both producers and consumers.

This course will also enable you to explore career options in business, define a career path, and make connections between classroom learning and the larger business community. This course will fulfill the Learning Community Seminar requirement for first time, full time students, to assist the student in making a successful transition into an academic environment. The course will aid you in learning insights, skills, and attitudes necessary to develop academic success strategies for personal and career goals achievement.

Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in Academic Reading III (ESL098) and Academic Writing III (ESL099) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) and Writing Skills I (ENG090) or exemption by placement testing.

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Introduction to Computer Science & Object Oriented Programming - 4 Credits -

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Introduction to Computer Science & Object Oriented Programming - 4 Credits -

This is a first course in Object Oriented Programming (OOP) theory, logic and design. Taught in the College’s hands-on computer classrooms, this course emphasizes the program design and development process including concepts of variables and flow control, objects, classes, methods, and polymorphism. You will use an Object Oriented Programming language as they design code, debug and implement several programs covering the topics presented. Students taking this course are expected to have solid knowledge of basic computer terminology, internet navigation and email, operating system and file management skills. Strong analytical skills are recommended for students enrolling in this course. Please note that this course is a four credit course with six contact hours and analogous homework.

This course fulfills the Learning Community Seminar requirement for students in AA Computer Science, AS Computer Science, and AS Computer Engineering areas of study. Other departments may allow this course to be used as a LC seminar for their students. Students in majors other than the ones listed above should obtain their advisor’s or the leading faculty member’s approval before registering in the course.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra (MAT099), Writing Skills II (ENG095), and Reading Skills II (RDG095) or placement. Pre/corequisite: College Alegebra-STEM (MAT194). For additional information and/or a course syllabus contact CITDepartment@bhcc.mass.edu.

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Introduction to Criminal Justice - 3 Credits -

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Introduction to Criminal Justice - 3 Credits -

A survey of the history, development and the role of American Criminal Justice System are presented. Included are the organizations and jurisdictions of the various agencies, a review of the court process, professional orientation, and the current trends in the criminal justice system. The course will offer you the ability to use state of the art technology and interactive instruction. It stresses the application of knowledge learned to real-life situations. Ethical behavior issues will be raised and students will develop strategies to set boundaries, understand differences among people, develop professional codes of conduct and behavior, and develop a professional moral code of conduct. The course fulfills the Learning Community Seminar requirement for students in AS Criminal Justice.

Prerequisites: Writing Skills II (ENG095) or placement and Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) or placement.

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Introduction to Law - 3 Credits -

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Introduction to Law - 3 Credits -

This course provides you with an understanding of the American legal system and the paralegal profession. The course emphasizes the role of the paralegal and the way that role complements that of the lawyer. The course explores the role of law in our society, the judicial system, legal research and writing, litigation, and legal ethics.

Prerequisites: Writing Skills II (ENG095), Reading Skills II (RDG095) or Academic Reading III (ESL098) or placement.

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Office & Information Management: Technology on the Move - 3 Credits -

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Office & Information Management: Technology on the Move - 3 Credits -

You will explore career opportunities in medical, legal, and executive administration fields. This course includes critical thinking and teamwork projects to help you develop the ability to give and receive constructive criticism in a supportive environment. You will complete individual and team projects that use Internet research and library resources. Based on research related to office and information management issues, you will develop written and oral presentation skills. Time management, listening, note-taking, and test-taking skills are emphasized. Security issues, legal and ethical issues, and cultural diversity are covered. Current students, alumni, and business personnel will provide perspectives on how to succeed in academia and in the business world.

Prerequisites: Writing Skills II (ENG095) or placement and Academic Reading III (ESL098) or Reading Skills II (RDG095) or placement. Pre/co-requisite: Keyboarding: Document Generation I (OIM101). Co-requisite: Group Dynamics (PSY107). Note: This change will not affect PSY107 requirements.

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Stepping Out of the Box - 3 Credits -

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Stepping Out of the Box - 3 Credits -

Have you ever accomplished something that you were told was out of reach? This class will focus on icons, athletes, and everyday people who have pushed self-imposed and societal boundaries to achieve great success. Students will explore the ways in which they have been boxed into certain social, cultural, familial, and academic roles and expectations, and they will develop and explore strategies to push down walls, step out of boxes, challenge boundaries and maximize their potential to achieve their goals. Open to first-year students.

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Fire Service, This Century and the Next, What Should We Expect - 3 Credits -

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Fire Service, This Century and the Next, What Should We Expect - 3 Credits -

This course provides you with the history of the fire service and its culture. You will research the ways that the fire service has changed over the past century and how it is expected to change in the next century. Topics will include the history for the fire service, changes in the fire service past and future, the evolution of equipment in the fire service, firefighter deaths and statistics as they pertain to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and its 16 Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives, as well as a field trip to the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) and the role of the state training centers and a field trip to the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy in Stow, MA.

These topics will be discussed with particular focus on the National Fire Administration’s Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) Professional Development Model and its explanation of how education, training, experience and individual development is needed for a successful job in the fire service. This course incorporates the learning outcomes of BHCC’s Learning Community Seminar and fulfills the Seminar’s requirements for first-time, college students.

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VMA Freshman Seminar - 3 Credits -

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VMA Freshman Seminar - 3 Credits -

This interdisciplinary course builds a connection to the aesthetic, historical and intellectual aspects of an artist community and creative work while helping you navigate through some of the logistical hurdles of the first year experience. You will participate in a variety of group activities, discussions and presentations with faculty and visiting artists. Field trips include local galleries/studios and museums. A journal/sketchbook is required. The course is required for all Visual and Media Arts majors.

Prerequisites: Writing Skills II (ENG095) and Foundations of Math (MAT093).

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The Color of Success: Exploring Issues of Women of Color -

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The Color of Success: Exploring Issues of Women of Color -

This course considers the cultural heritage, history, and media representations of women of color in America. You will examine society's perceptions of women of color, self-perceptions, and the issues that contribute to these perceptions. The course encourages you to make decisions that lead to academic, career and personal success. This is designed for women of color and is open to first-year students.